Content

Send Us Feedback

Interactive Technology Portal
From Food Tech Innovation Portal

Dry heat sterilization of spices

Identification

Key words Spices, dry heat, sterilization, essential oil, D-carvone, D-limonene
Latest version 2012/04/12
Completed by FRIP

How does it work?

Primary objective Sterilization of spices by dry heat without loss of essential oils and aroma substances
Working principle The presented method of spices sterilization is based on dry heating. Spices are placed in a rotating sterilizer. The walls are heated by electrical wires up to 120°C. Spices inside are stirred automatically for better heat transfer and homogeneity of process. The evaporated water during process is condensed in closed circuit (which prevents the particles and flavorings loss) and the dry air is returned back to the sterilizer. The condensate is accumulated. After sterilization this condensate is returned back because it contains essential oil. In terms of microorganisms inactivation it was found that heat treatment at 120 °C for 2 hours removes molds, yeasts, Salmonella, B. cereus (vegetative form and spores) and total bacterial count was reduced [1, 2, 3].
Images
Additional effects -
Important process parameters Temperature , time, dose of spices , heat transfer surface, rotation speed

heat power

Important product parameters water contents, initial microorganisms population, colour parameters

Cumin: There was about 45% increase in D-limonene compared to the untreated sample. Additionally D-carvone content was 7 times higher compared to the untreated sample. Essences were a little bit increased compared to the untreated sample. Total bacterial count was reduced (2h, 120°C) about 3 log (from 5.6x104 to <1x101 CFU/g). Bacillus cereus (spores) was reduced from 2x101 to <1x101 CFU/g [1].

Pepper: Essences were almost the same in comparison with the untreated sample. Total bacterial count was reduced (2h, 120°C) about 2 log (from 2.5 x 105 to 7.5 x 103 ). Bacillus cereus (spores) was reduced from 5x101 to <1x101 CFU/g [2].

What can it be used for?

Products Spices
Operations Sterilization spices before packaging and distribution
Solutions for short comings This method delivers sterilised spices with preservation of essential oil and aroma substances. Ethylene oxide fumigation or irradiation methods are not so suitable because safety food (free radicals, new chemical substances). Steam sterilization technology and the subsequent drying is not beneficial in terms of partial loss of aromatic substances.

What can it NOT be used for?

Products heat sensitive spices
Operations
Other limitations Changing of colour parameters
Risks or hazards

Implementation

Maturity There exists the experimental appliance
Modularity /Implementation After scale-up this system can be included to the product line (batch system)
Consumer aspects
Legal aspects Accepted technology
Environmental aspects

Further Information

Institutes FRIP
Companies Roastech, Global Sterilization and Fumigation, American Natural & Organic Spices
References [1] Kýhos K., Landfeld A., Strohalm J., Novotná P. Průchová J., Schlemmerová L., Hajšlová J., Riddellová K., Houška M. (2007): Heat treatment of cumin in a homogenizing sterilizer, monitoring color, essential oil content and microbial composition, Internal research report, FRIP

[2] Kýhos K., Landfeld A., Strohalm J., Novotná P. Průchová J., Paulíčková I., Houška M. (2007): Heat treatment of pepper in a homogenizing sterilizer, monitoring color, essential oil content, microbial composition and sensory evaluation, Internal research report, FRIP

[3] Houska M., Kyhos K., Strohalm J., Landfeld A., Novotna P. (2010): Heat sterilization method of spices with subsequent recovery of aromatic substances. Patent No. 301416.

Temperature , time, dose of spices , heat transfer surface, rotation speed heat powerwarning.png"Temperature , time, dose of spices , heat transfer surface, rotation speed heat power" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki. water contents, initial microorganisms population, colour parameters

Cumin: There was about 45% increase in D-limonene compared to the untreated sample. Additionally D-carvone content was 7 times higher compared to the untreated sample. Essences were a little bit increased compared to the untreated sample. Total bacterial count was reduced (2h, 120°C) about 3 log (from 5.6x104 to <1x101 CFU/g). Bacillus cereus (spores) was reduced from 2x101 to <1x101 CFU/g [1].

Pepper: Essences were almost the same in comparison with the untreated sample. Total bacterial count was reduced (2h, 120°C) about 2 log (from 2.5 x 105 to 7.5 x 103 ). Bacillus cereus (spores) was reduced from 5x101 to <1x101 CFU/g [2].warning.png"water contents, initial microorganisms population, colour parameters

Cumin: There was about 45% increase in D-limonene compared to the untreated sample. Additionally D-carvone content was 7 times higher compared to the untreated sample. Essences were a little bit increased compared to the untreated sample. Total bacterial count was reduced (2h, 120°C) about 3 log (from 5.6x104 to &lt;1x101 CFU/g). Bacillus cereus (spores) was reduced from 2x101 to &lt;1x101 CFU/g [1].

Pepper: Essences were almost the same in comparison with the untreated sample. Total bacterial count was reduced (2h, 120°C) about 2 log (from 2.5 x 105 to 7.5 x 103 ). Bacillus cereus (spores) was reduced from 5x101 to &lt;1x101 CFU/g [2]." cannot be used as a page name in this wiki. Dryers 2.2.2 physical stabilizing other Web of science: dry heat spice - 5 articles were found, were not relevant, also sources from internet (Google) and internal reports were used. WikiSysop :Template:Review document :Template:Review status



Translate this page with Google Translator (automatic translation)
Created by LandfeldA on 2 October 2012, at 08:48