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High pressure pasteurization of fish to prolong their freshness

Identification

Key words High pressure, pasteurization, fish, herring, salmon, red mullet, hake, mackerel, haddock, tuna, in-pack processing
Latest version 2011/08/11
Completed by FRIP, IRTA

How does it work?

Primary objective Cold pasteurization of fish to extend their shelf life.
Working principle High pressure processing is a novel technology for preservation of food. It can extend the shelf life of fresh fish. Under normal refrigerated storage conditions, the shelf life of fish products is limited by enzymatic and microbiological spoilage. Both enzymes and microorganisms can be inactivated by high pressure processing.
Images
Additional effects
  • Color changes : lightness and yellowness values increase with pressure, redness decreases with pressure [6]
  • Textural modification: hardness of samples increase with pressure [6]

Pressures higher than 400 MPa can change significantly the color and texture of fish meat. The meat can have the appearance of cooked muscle [5].

Important process parameters pressure, temperature, time, length of storage, used packaging material

Example: the microbiological shelf life of HP treated fish can be extended; e.g. for fresh herring and fresh haddock by about 9 days/4°C [1]; cooked salmon by about 6 days/4°C [3], red mullet by about 3 days/4°C [4], hake about 7 days/ 2-3°C [5], smoked mackerel about twice longer/4°C [2] compared to untreated fish. For all fishes were used pressure higher or equal to 200 MPa, maximally 330 MPa for 3 – 15 minute.

Important product parameters pH, aw, protein, lipid, salt or sugar content

What can it be used for?

Products herring, salmon, red mullet, hake, mackerel, haddock
Operations Pasteurization
Solutions for short comings Rapid and gentle pasteurization that doesn’t change the quality.

What can it NOT be used for?

Products -
Operations not ready for sterilization.
Other limitations batch process, equipments need a high investment and are expensive.
Risks or hazards Pressure resistance of target microorganisms (spores) different from heat resistant.

Implementation

Maturity High pressure pasteurisation is already used in food industry (benefits: return on investment, growth, minimal processing). New equipments with lower costs and higher production rates are being developed, meaning that new applications are being developed and are economically feasible.
Modularity /Implementation This technology can be included in production line (batch system). More at High pressure processing.
Consumer aspects High pressure processing
Legal aspects
  • EU: No novel food approval required, no declaration or labelling required. Decision is let on the member states.(SKLM 6.12.2004)
  • Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries (FAO -1995) and the Code of Conduct for the European Aquaculture (FEAP - 2000)
  • Seafood and fish safety is a quality pre-requisite, assured by law with the aim of the consumers' health protection, throughout both horizontal (Dir. 43/93/EEC, Reg. CE 466/2001, 2375/2001, 178/2002) and vertical (Reg. CE 2377/90, Dir. 91/67/EEC, 492/91/EEC, 493/91/EEC) regulations
  • Codex Alimentarius(vol.9 Codex Standard for Fish and fishery products, 1999)
Environmental aspects Energy efficient

Further Information

Institutes Wageningen UR - FBR, IRTA, DIL, TU Berlin, DIFRES, Agri-Food & Biosciences Institute
Companies Hiperbaric, Motivatit Seafoods, Avure, Uhde-HPT, APA Processing
References [1] Karim NU, Kennedy T , Linton M, Watson S, Gault N, Patterson MF (2011): Effect of high pressure processing on the quality of herring (Clupea harengus) and haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus) stored on ice, Food Control, 22 (3-4): 476-484

[2] Kloczko I., Chudoba T., (1998): Attempt of using high hydrostatic pressure for preservation of some fish products, Przemysl Spozywczy 51 (7) 46–48

[3] Picouet PA, Cofan-Carbo S, Vilaseca H, et al. (2011): Stability of sous-vide cooked salmon loins processed by high pressure, Innovative Food Science & Emerging Technologies, 12(1): 26 – 31

[4] Erkan N, Uretener G, Alpas H (2010): Effect of high pressure (HP) on the quality and shelf life of red mullet (Mullus surmelutus), Innovative Food Science & Emerging Technologies, 11 (2): 259-264

[5] Hurtado JL, Montero P, Borderias AJ (2000): Extension of shelf life of chilled hake (Merluccius capensis) by high pressure, Food Science and Technology International, 6 (3): 243-249

[6] Ramirez-Suarez J.C , Morrissey M.T. (2005): Effect of high pressure processing (HPP) on shelf life of albacore tuna (Thunnus alalunga) minced muscle, Innovative Food Science and Emerging Technologies, 7 (2006) 19–27

pressure, temperature, time, length of storage, used packaging material

Example: the microbiological shelf life of HP treated fish can be extended; e.g. for fresh herring and fresh haddock by about 9 days/4°C [1]; cooked salmon by about 6 days/4°C [3], red mullet by about 3 days/4°C [4], hake about 7 days/ 2-3°C [5], smoked mackerel about twice longer/4°C [2] compared to untreated fish. For all fishes were used pressure higher or equal to 200 MPa, maximally 330 MPa for 3 – 15 minute.warning.png"pressure, temperature, time, length of storage, used packaging material

Example: the microbiological shelf life of HP treated fish can be extended; e.g. for fresh herring and fresh haddock by about 9 days/4°C [1]; cooked salmon by about 6 days/4°C [3], red mullet by about 3 days/4°C [4], hake about 7 days/ 2-3°C [5], smoked mackerel about twice longer/4°C [2] compared to untreated fish. For all fishes were used pressure higher or equal to 200 MPa, maximally 330 MPa for 3 – 15 minute." cannot be used as a page name in this wiki. pH, aw, protein, lipid, salt or sugar content High Pressure equipment 2.2.2 physical stabilizing other ISI Web of knowledge Search terms: high pressure, fish shelf life WikiSysop :Template:Review document :Template:Review status



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Created by Hte irta on 3 February 2012, at 12:05