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Modelling and prediction of quality of meat and meat products packaged in modified atmosphere during storage.

Identification

Key words packaging, meat, modified atmosphere, modelling, prediction, MAP, quality, storage
Latest version 2010/12/23
Completed by FRIP

How does it work?

Primary objective Prediction of changes in packages with meat and/or meat products under modified atmosphere at given storage conditions.
Working principle chemical, physical, biological

Packaging of the meat and meat products in modified atmosphere is widely used in practice. The aim of such treatment is to minimize the oxidation changes of packaged products as well as to eliminate the growth of sensitive types of microorganisms. So far the prediction of optimal parameters of such packaging systems is difficult due to very complex nature of processes occurring in packaged meat and meat products. On the other hand the application of suitable predictive models could be useful tool how to reduce the price for the development of such packaging systems in practice.

Application of mathematical modelling in a design of modified atmosphere packaging systems for meat and meat products. Models mostly cover chemical, enzymatic and microbiological changes of packaged product as well as the alteration of the modified atmosphere composition.

Images
Additional effects Acceleration and cost reduction of the design of modified atmosphere packaging systems for meat and meat products.
Important process parameters Package permeability, storage conditions like temperature, humidity,composition of MAP.
Important product parameters Microorganism contamination, modified atmosphere composition, product composition,

What can it be used for?

Products Meat and meat products can be stored longer and higher quality is attained during the shelf life, easier slice separation, lower microbial risk
Operations Packaging, storage of packaged products.
Solutions for short comings Food shelf-life extension, food safety (lower concentration of chemical preservatives used)

The main studied problems with possible utilization in practice:

  • Application of microbial models for meat and meat products [1,2,3,8,11,12,13].
  • Prediction of gas absorption in packaged meat and meat products at given storage conditions [5,6,7,16,22].
  • Gas permeability through the layered barrier packaging films [18,19,20,23].

The main studied problems with potential application in far future:

  • Complex modelling of chemical, enzymatic and microbiological changes of packaged product as well as the alteration of the modified atmosphere composition [4,9,10,14,15,17,21].

What can it NOT be used for?

Products No
Operations No
Other limitations Broad ranges of conditions under which meat and meat products are processed e.g. temperature, initial microbial load, water activity, pH, influence of packaging on meat colour, packaging material oxygen permeability
Risks or hazards Pathogen microorganism growth

Implementation

Maturity Application of microbial models for meat and meat products, prediction of gas absorption in packaged meat and meat products at given storage conditions and the gas transport via the layered barrier packaging films seem to be quite mature processes. Complex modelling of chemical, enzymatic and microbiological changes of packaged product as well as the alteration of the modified atmosphere composition is in the stage of laboratory testing.
Modularity /Implementation Application of MA models for meat and meat product does not claim substantial changes of existing production lines. The models are not capable to work on-line in regime of predictive control, yet. This is the future application, vision.
Consumer aspects Consumer does not care the way of packaging system design but there are some packaging materials that enable limited oxygen permeation that causes the meat surface oxidation. Resulting bright red attracts consumer. He/she perceive this meat as fresh.
Legal aspects No special legislation is necessary
Environmental aspects No

Further Information

Institutes Norconserv, NULS, A.U.Th. School of Agriculture, Ghent University - LFMFP, UTFSM, University of Milan, The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Wageningen UR - FBR
Companies
References [1] Del-Valle V., Almenar V., Lagarón J.M., Catalá R, Gavara R.: Modelling permeation through porous polymeric films for modified atmosphere packaging. Food Additives and Contaminants 20 (2), 170-179, 2003.


[2] Devlieghere F., Geeraerd A.H., Versyck K.J., Vandewaetere B., Van Impe J., Debevere J.: Growth of Listeria monocytogenes in modified atmosphere packaged cooked meat products: A predictive model. Food Microbiology 18, 53-66, 2001.

[3] Giannuzzi L., Pinotti A., Zaritzki N.: Mathematical modelling of microbial growth in packaged refrigerated beef stored at different temperatures. International Journal of Food Microbiology 39 (1-2), 101-110, 1998.

[4] Jacobsen M., Bertelsen G.: Colour stability and lipid oxidation of fresh beef. Development of a response surface model for predicting the effects of temperature, storage time and modified atmosphere composition. Meat Science 54, 49-57, 2000.

[5] Jacobsen M., Bertelsen G.: Active packaging and colour control: the case of meat. In R. Ahvenainen (Ed.), Novel food packaging techniques, pp. 401-415. Cambridge, UK, Woodhead Publishing Ltd., 2003.

[6] Jacobsen M., Bertelsen G.: Predicting the amount of carbon dioxide absorbed in meat. Meat Science 68 (4), 603-610, 2004.

[7] Jacobsen M., Bertelsen G.: Predicting amount of carbon dioxide absorbed in meat. Meat Science 68, 603-610, 2004.

[8] Koutsoumanis K., Taoukis P., Drosinos E., Nychas G.: Applicability of an Arrhenius model for the combined effect of temperature and CO2 packaging on the spoilage microflora of fish. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 66 (8), 3528-3534, 2000.

[9] Koutsoumanis K., Nychas G.: Application of a systematic experimental procedure to develop a microbial model for rapid fish shelf life prediction. International Journal of Food Microbiology 60, 171-184, 2000.

[10] Koutsoumanis K.: Predictive modelling of the shelf-life of fish under nonisothermal conditions. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 67 (4), 1821-1829, 2001.

[11] Koutsoumanis K., Giannakourou M.C., Taoukis P., Nychas G.: Application of shelf life decision system (SLDS) to marine cultured fish quality. International Journal of Food Microbiology 73, 375-382, 2002.

[12] Koutsoumanis K., Taoukis P., Nychas G.: Development of a Safety Monitoring and Assurance System (SMAS) for chilled food products. International Journal of Food Microbiology 100, 253-260, 2005.

[13] Koutsoumanis K., Stamatiou A., Skadamis P., Nychas G.: Development of a microbial model for the combined effect of temperature and pH on spoilage of ground meat, and validation of the model under dynamic temperature conditions. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 72, 124-134, 2006.

[14] Limbo S., Torri L., Sinelli N., Franzetti L., Casiraghi E.: Evaluation and predictive modelling of the shelf life of minced beef stored in high-oxygen modified atmosphere packaging at different temperatures. Meat Science 84, 129-136, 2010.

[15] Matagaras M., Drosinos E.H., Vaidanis A., Metaxopoulos I.: Development of a predictive model for spoilage of cooked cured meat products and its validation under constant and dynamic temperature storage conditions. Journal of Food Science 71, M157-M167, 2006.
[16] McMillin K.W.: Where is MAP going? A review and future potential of modified atmosphere packaging for meat. Meat Science 80(1), 43-65, 2008.

[17] Nicolade C., Stetzer A.J., Tucker E.M., McKeith F.K., Brewer M.S.: Development of a model system to mimic beef bone discoloration. Journal of Food Science 70 (9), C575-C580, 2005.

[18] Rodriguez-Aguilera R., Oliveira J.C.: Review of design engineering methods and applications of active and modified atmosphere packaging systems. Food Engineering Reviews 1, 66-83, 2009.

[19] Rotabakk B.T., Wyller J., Lekang O.I., Sivertsvik M.: A mathematical method for determining equilibrium gas composition in modified atmosphere packaging and soluble gas stabilization systems for non-respiring foods. Journal of Food Engineering 85, 479-490, 2008.

[20] Simpson R., Almonacid S., Acevedo C.: Development of a mathematical model for map systems applied to nonrespiring foods. Journal of Food Science 66 (4), 561-567, 2001.

[21] Simpson R., Almonacid S., Acevedo C., Cortes C.: Mathematical model to predict effect of temperature abuse in MAP systems applied to Pacific Hake (Merluccius australis). Journal of Food Process Engineering 26, 413-434, 2003.

[22] Simpson R., Carevic E.: Designing a modified atmosphere packaging systems for foodservice portions on nonrespiring foods: Optimal gas mixture and food/headspace ratio. Foodservice Research International 14, 257-272, 2004.

[23] Van Bree I., De Meulanaer B., Samapundo S., Vermeulen A., Ragaert P., Maes K.C., De Baets B.,Devlieghere F.: Predicting the headspace oxygen level due to oxygen permeation across multilayer polymer packaging materials: A practical software simulation tool. Innovative Food Science and Emerging Technologies 11, 511-519, 2010.

Package permeability, storage conditions like temperature, humidity,composition of MAP. Microorganism contamination, modified atmosphere composition, product composition, Packaging of solids 2.2.5 physical, chemical, biological stabilizing, packaging ICT, biotechnology Seven databases were used, i.e. FSTA, ISI Web of Knowledge, ScienceDirect, SpringerLink, Wiley InterScience, and FOODnetBASE, as well as Google programme. The publications after 2000 were searched, general keywords were tested in title, abstract and keywords: meat packaging AND modified atmosphere AND modelling meat packaging AND modified atmosphere AND prediction WikiSysop :Template:Review document :Template:Review status



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Created by Hamoen on 17 January 2012, at 11:16